Viviana Meloni

Viviana Meloni

Victoria Avenue

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Victoria Avenue

About me

Tell me your history in your mother tongue: I receive Italian and Spanish patients, as well as from English.

I conduct sessions in Liverpool Street.

Have you ever asked to yourself why a huge elephant is trapped by a little chain in the circus?

​When I was little, I used to love circuses, and what I liked best about them were the animals. The elephant in particular caught my attention, and as I later found out, other children liked the elephant too.

During the performance, this enormous beast would nobly display its tremendous weight, size, and strength... But after its performance, and until just before it went out on stage, the elephant was always tied down with a chain to a little stake in the ground that held one of its feet.

The stake however was just a minuscule piece of wood, hardly a couple of centimeters long. And although it was a strong thick chain, it seemed obvious to me that an animal capable of tearing a tree from its roots, could easily free itself from that stake and flee.

This mystery continued to puzzle me. What held it there? Why didn't it escape? When I was 5 or 6, I still trusted the explanations given by grownups. So, I asked my teacher, my father, and my uncle about the mystery of the elephant. One of them explained that the elephant didn't escape because it had been mastered.

So I asked the obvious question: " If it's been mastered, why do they keep it in chains?"

I don't remember having received a coherent answer. With time I forgot about the mystery of the elephant, I only remembered when I found others who had asked themselves the same question at some time.

Years later, I discovered that , to my luck, someone had been sufficiently wise to come up with the answer:

The circus elephant does not escape because it has been attached to a stake just like this one since it was very, very small.

I closed my eyes and imagined a defenseless baby elephant fastened to the stake. I am sure that in that moment, the little guy pushed and pulled and tired himself out trying to get himself free. And, regardless of his efforts, he couldn't do it, because the stake was too strong for him.

I imagined him tuckering himself out and falling asleep and the next day trying again, and the next day, and the next. Until one day, a terrible day in his history, the animal accepted its futility and resigned itself to its fate.

That enormous powerful elephant that you see in the circus does not escape because, unfortunate thing, he thinks he can't.

He has that memory etched into his mind: the futility that he felt shortly after he was born.

And the worst part is that he has never returned to seriously question that memory.

Never again did he return to test his own strength...

So we are a bit like the circus elephant: We live with the idea that "we can not" do things for the simple reason that once, long ago, when we were little, we tried and have failed. "

​Jorge Bucay

Training, qualifications & experience

Master degree in Psychology from the Italian University of Cagliari, I finished my exams one year earlier, making use of prestigious scholarships that were granted to me for merit as well as recognition of my ability.

After passing the state exam for Professional licence and after working for the Italian national Health System in the psychology sector, I moved to Spain, broadening my studies further in Madrid, Valencia, Zaragoza and Barcelona.

I gained acknowledgment and validation of my titles from the Italian embassy in Spain and I obtained the title of “Master in psychosocial rehabilitation in mental health” with top marks from Barcelona’s Universita’ Autonoma. In the same city I worked for around 10 years at the Catalan Justice department as well as in numerous institutions related to health departments.

I deepened my passions by studying at the Drama Academy in Barcelona (recognised by the education department) and studying the analogies between theatre and psychology

This path further proved to me the vital importance of “puppets without strings” which represent the upper hand of instinct over reason

I continued by specialising as a Pet therapy expert from the international human and animal behaviour institute, by conducting detailed researches on the importance of motivation as essential element to sickness

Registered both with the psychologists’ college in Italy as well as in Spain I decided to accept a new challenge and moved to London.

In London I have got the HCPC registration as a Practitioner counselling psychologist and I am a member of the British psychological society, BPS. Whereas I was working in Spain I was member of the "Col.legi de psicolegs de Barcelona" (Oficial College of Psychologist in Barcelona) and in Italy with the "Colleggio ufficiale degli psicologi della Sardegna" (Oficial College of Psychologist in Sardinia).

I carry out my activity of Practitioner and Counselling Psychologist for the National Health Service and offer private consultations in Italian, Spanish English and Catalan. I constantly develop with selected training updates.

Member organisations

Registered / Accredited



Reasonable prices - please contact for more information.

Maps & Directions

London, EC2M 4NS

Type of session

Online counselling: No
Telephone counselling: No
Face to face counselling: Yes

Practical details

Sign language: Unspecified
Other languages: Italian, Spanish and Catalan.


Monday, Tuesday, Saturday and Sunday.

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